[Architecture] [UX/DSN] A few notes from Google I/O....

Tony Atkins tony at raisingthefloor.org
Tue May 24 14:55:26 UTC 2016


Hi, Jim:

As far as I know, the current android GPII implementation has limited
functionality unless you have a rooted device.  So, Instant apps are more
of a long term opportunity than something we could make use of immediately.

Cheers,


Tony

On Tue, May 24, 2016 at 12:02 PM, Jim Tobias <tobias at inclusive.com> wrote:

> Thanks for all this interesting stuff.
>
>
>
> Regarding the GPII implications, is it possible to launch any instant part
> of GPII without having GPII installed on the device? I’m only familiar with
> scenarios in which GPII is installed and autoruns at boot.
>
>
>
>
>
> ***
> Jim Tobias
> Inclusive Technologies
> +1.908.907.2387 v/t
> skype jimtobias
>
> @inclutech
>
>
>
> *From:* Architecture [mailto:architecture-bounces at lists.gpii.net] *On
> Behalf Of *Sandstrum, Jim
> *Sent:* Monday, May 23, 2016 12:01 PM
> *To:* Whitney Quesenbery <whitneyq at civicdesign.org>; UX-DSN <
> ux-dsn at raisingthefloor.org>; Steve Lee <steve at opendirective.com>; Tony
> Atkins <tony at raisingthefloor.org>
> *Cc:* architecture at lists.gpii.net Architecture <
> architecture at lists.gpii.net>
> *Subject:* Re: [Architecture] [UX/DSN] A few notes from Google I/O....
>
>
>
> From my reading, instant apps are primarily purpose based. E.g. Only the
> parts of the app that need to run are downloaded on the fly and nothing is
> installed on the device.  Once the user experience is complete the app
> experience ends. There also appears to be restrictions on the functionality
> of instant apps. They are sandboxed and features normally associated with
> an installed app, such as access to background processes, will not be
> available.  From my understanding instant apps will also only function for
> apps published to the play store which will cut down on the malware piece.
>
>
>
> As an example use case, an instant app could be used to purchase a pair of
> shoes from Zappos even without the Zappos app installed on the device. The
> user browses the Zappos site, finds a snazzy pair of loafers and clicks the
> “buy with app link.”  The phone downloads only the parts of the app that
> are required to pull up the loafers in the user’s cart and for payment.
> Once payment is made the app components disappear.  The idea is that the
> purchasing experience is much nicer using the instant app than the mobile
> web.  From an interaction perspective instant apps promise significantly
> fewer steps for the user. Instant apps will give users the option of
> installing the full app of course but that is up to the user’s discretion.
> I personally can’t afford to buy my shoes from Zappos so do not have the
> app installed, however there may come a time when I find that perfect pair
> of loafers on Zappos and …
>
>
>
> Of course this is a wonderful mechanism for app discovery as it
> significantly reduces the friction (searching for an app and its
> installation) associated when you simply want to buy something.
>   Developers should really like this feature.  This discovery aspect would
> certainly help GPII as well.
>
>
>
> I could see an instant app link on the mobile landing page at AJC’s which
> would enable access to the GPII app’s user context functionality. Quick
> access to what the user needs in the moment and nothing more. No need to
> tap the home button, tap the app drawer, swipe to find the GPII app, tap
> the app to open it, navigate to the contexts feature…… and that is assuming
> the user has GPII installed. Of course they would be so thrilled with the
> GPII instant app functionality that they would then want to install the
> entire app. J
>
>
>
> Jim
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* ux-dsn at raisingthefloor.org [mailto:ux-dsn at raisingthefloor.org
> <ux-dsn at raisingthefloor.org>] *On Behalf Of *Whitney Quesenbery
> *Sent:* Monday, May 23, 2016 4:54 AM
> *To:* UX-DSN <ux-dsn at raisingthefloor.org>; Steve Lee <
> steve at opendirective.com>; Tony Atkins <tony at raisingthefloor.org>
> *Cc:* Gregg Vanderheiden <gregg at raisingthefloor.org>;
> architecture at lists.gpii.net Architecture <architecture at lists.gpii.net>
> *Subject:* Re: [UX/DSN] [Architecture] A few notes from Google I/O....
>
>
>
> Tangential to GPII, doesn’t it sound like there’s a lot of opportunity for
> mischief in
>
>
>
> "It can do anything else a normal app can do.  So, for example, clicking
> on the results of a first discovery tool to download your settings could
> result in installing the GPII Android app, which would do lots of other
> things besides intercepting calls to download preference sets.”
>
>
>
> It *sounds like* anyone can create a link that could send a user to any
> app and install it, and that that app then acts as though the  user had
> intentionally downloaded all of its capabilities.
>
>
>
> I can see all of the benefits for GII (because we believe it’s
> beneficial), but doesn’t this leave the user with little or no control over
> their own device, with lots of possibilities for malware?
>
>
>
> Whitney
>
>
> * Whitney Quesenbery*
>
> *Center for Civic Design*
>
> *civicdesign.org <http://civicdesign.org>*
>
> Direct:  908-617-1122  | Skype: whitneyq  | whitneyq at civicdesign.org
>
>
>
> On May 23, 2016, at 3:50 AM, Steve Lee <steve at opendirective.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> Thanks for the clarification. Sound like some good applications as you
> suggest.
>
> It does appear the UX is better defined than for progressive web apps.
> Though this is android only.
>
> Steve
>
>
>
> On Mon, May 23, 2016 at 12:36 AM -0700, "Tony Atkins" <
> tony at raisingthefloor.org> wrote:
>
> Hi, All:
>
>
>
> The integration between web apps and apps is handled using "app links
> <https://developer.android.com/training/app-links/index.html>".  By
> default, a plain old web link is handled by the browser.  A web site can
> provide a particular settings file in a well-known location that indicates
> what apps are allowed to intercept links to the site.  You don't have to
> have control of the apps you allow, you can list anyone's app as
> appropriate.  However, the reverse is not true.  Although anyone can
> indicate in their manifest that they handle links to your site, but the app
> will only be allowed to intercept the link if your site has the app's
> details in its settings file.  "Instant Apps" extends this, my
> understanding is that when you visit the site, the list of allowed apps on
> the web site is read, and you are presented with a single-click link to
> temporarily install an allowed app.
>
>
>
> However, the app doesn't only have to intercept links to the web site.  It
> can do anything else a normal app can do.  So, for example, clicking on the
> results of a first discovery tool to download your settings could result in
> installing the GPII Android app, which would do lots of other things
> besides intercepting calls to download preference sets.
>
>
>
> As there is a path to promote an "instant app" to be just like any other
> installed app, the "sandboxing" part of the equation is more about how far
> you can take the user without asking them to commit to installing the app
> for real.
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
>
>
> Tony
>
>
>
> On Sun, May 22, 2016 at 5:45 PM, Steve Lee <steve at opendirective.com>
> wrote:
>
> That's an interesting idea. I'll explore it some more. I had thought it
> had only related to native web apps. With progressive web apps giving a
> better launch experience for web.
>
> Steve Lee
> Sent from my mobile device Please excuse typing errors
>
> On 21 May 2016 13:11, "Gregg Vanderheiden" <gregg at raisingthefloor.org>
> wrote:
>
> Very interesting
>
>
>
> I added the UX group
>
>
>
> This has lots of implications for our work.  Not for adaptive AT - because
> it is sandboxed.   But for having alternate interfaces to web sites - that
> are easier to use etc.
>
>
>
> Is it correct that the instant app would only be able to work for the
> website in question?   Or would it work more broadly.   It seems it would
> work more broadly or else it could just be done already in javascript - no?
>   (Part of this will be answered by your “what APIs it has access to..”
>  question — because this is going to be more than javascript does.
>
>
>
> hmmm.   will be interesting to learn more.
>
>
>
> thanks
>
>
> *gregg*
>
>
>
> On May 20, 2016, at 3:39 AM, Tony Atkins <tony at raisingthefloor.org> wrote:
>
>
>
> Hi, All:
>
>
>
> Colin pinged me about my impression of Google I/O, which took place this
> week.  I am finally catching up on the blogs and announcements, and thought
> I'd share a few things with the group.
>
>
>
> First, I wanted to point out the accessibility improvements in  Android
> N.  First, the user side:
>
>
>
> https://developer.android.com/preview/behavior-changes.html#accessibility
>
>
>
> In this release, they will add a first class screen magnification option,
> which works with all existing apps.  The welcome/setup screen also now
> includes controls to turn on a range of accessibility tools including the
> magnification controls, Talkback (their screen reader), and other options.
>
>
>
> There are also improvements on the developer side:
>
>
>
>
> https://developer.android.com/preview/api-overview.html#accessibility_enhancements
>
>
>
> In Lollipop, they added support for physical switches.  With Android N,
> they are adding a new API that should make it easier to build eye-tracking
> software and other alternatives to using the touchscreen.
>
>
>
> They have added the concept of  an "Instant App", which is a native app
> that can be downloaded and run without installing it:
>
>
>
> https://developer.android.com/topic/instant-apps/index.html
>
>
>
> Their demo is of a user clicking a link on a web site, being presented
> with the option to view the content with the site's app, and then having
> the site's app load the content.
>
>
>
> For my own app, I have been thinking of create a catalog of picture board
> configurations online, targeted to different communities, for example,
> children with Autism and adults with difficulty speaking have very
> different needs.
>
>
>
> By configuring the app to handle links to a particular site, I can set up
> a pipeline where clicking a particular link in a web catalog results in a
> configuration change in the app.  This is already possible for users who
> have the app installed.  "Instant apps" would let users who are deciding
> whether to use the app at all try it out with a particular configuration in
> a single click.
>
>
>
> To avoid making a user click through a bunch of permissions checks,
> "instant" apps are sandboxed.  I couldn't find details about what APIs are
> exposed within the sandbox, but I have signed up for the developer beta for
> my own app, and will share what I learn with anyone who is interested.
>
>
>
> I will have the Android N preview with me in Toronto if anyone wants to
> try it out.
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
>
>
> Tony
>
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